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This blog is the digital continuation of the WVLS newsletter, "The Lamplighter," and exists to share WVLS updates, news from libraries in our area, training opportunities, helpful tips and resources, national library news and more. To contribute to this blog, email Inese Christman.


CALL Conference Feb 9: Collaborate!

01/20/2017

Call Conference

The 1st Conference About Libraries & Literacy (CALL) is scheduled for February 9, 2017.

Attendees can expect to network and discover new ways to collaborate with like-minded people from all library types. The theme "If Only They Knew" refers to the idea that each library has things to share that could help other libraries be more successful as they strive to advance literacy in kindergarten through college-age patrons. What better way to start the conversation then to bring everyone together for a day of connecting and sharing the things that could help libraries of different types be successful, "if only they knew" about those things.

A collaboration between the UW-La Crosse Murphy Library, the School District of La Crosse, the La Crosse Public Library and Western Technical College. 

Anne Hamland / ahamland@wvls.org


Wild Wisconsin Winter Web Conference: Jan 24-26

01/20/2017

Wild Wisconsin Winter Web Conference 2017

Have you registered for the Wild Wisconsin Winter Web Conference yet? 

19 webinars on staff empowerment, youth services, tech trends, leadership, and small but mighty libraries.

January 24-26, 2017. Register here!

Anne Hamland / ahamland@wvls.org


#30SecondBookTalk Challenge!

01/16/2017

Library Girl #30SecondBookTalk

Do you or your co-workers give Book Talks?

Would you like to but aren't sure where to start?

The Adventures of Library Girl (Blog) is here to save the day!

See the full blog "#30SecondBookTalk Challenge! It's Time for ROUND1!" from The Adventures of Library Girl blog posted January 12, 2017.

Jennifer LaGarde (aka Library Girl) presents the 2017 World Book Talk Championship! LeGarde, the Lead School Library Media Coordinator/Digital Teaching and Learnign Specialist for New Hanover Schools in Wilmington, NC,  gathered book talks from 16 educators around the world. Each are 30 seconds long. These book talkers will promote their book talks using Twitter Handles to earn YOUR VOTES. 

 Submitted by Marla Sepnafski.

Anne Hamland / ahamland@wvls.org


Guns in the Library: You Have the Policy... How Do You Enforce It?

01/13/2017

Gun image via Clip Art Jan 13 2017

(Wisconsin Libraries for Everyone, published January 12, 2017)

If your policy states that weapons are prohibited, consider including an action plan in the event that this condition is violated.

For example, the policy could state, "The Library is a weapon free environment. If staff become aware, whether by report or observation,  that someone in the building may be carrying a weapon, they are directed to contact the Anytown Police Department by dialing 911, and the responding officer(s) will determine the appropriate response. Any person found to be carrying a weapon in violation of this will be suspended from the library for a period to be determined by the library director.

Would one of your staff approach someone with a weapon? Do not risk finding out. Review your behavior policy and procedure manual and, with your library board, make any amendments necessary to take this decision out of the hands of the staff member facing the situation on the fly.

Anne Hamland / ahamland@wvls.org


Make Your Marketing Work for Special Populations

01/11/2017

ALSC Making Your Marketing Work for Special Populations

Marketing to special populations is no different than marketing any other resource and service provided by your library. There is no difference between offering something nobody knows about and not offering it at all.

ALSC Blog from January 7, 2017: "Making Your Marketing Work for Special Populations"

This article is a guest post from the ALSC Library Service to Special Population Children and Their Caregivers Committee. The article applies to library service for special population groups of all ages with other general marketing tips.

Submitted by Kris Adams Wendt.

Anne Hamland / ahamland@wvls.org


WVLS Tech Team Finishing Migration to New Server Location

01/10/2017

Ethernet Cable via Clip Art

Today Tuesday January 10, 2017

We were able to schedule our IP address block migration for this morning (see in-depth information below).  The process should be completed before the opening hours today of most of our BCN members.  We are ready to rollback quickly in the event of any unforeseen issues critical to operations.

Check the LibrariesWIN Status Page for regular updates on operational status changes.

Finishing the Server Move  

We still need to migrate the IPSEC tunnels utilized by libraries on Charter (and Granton CL via the Granton School's network) to connect back in to the WVLS WAN.  Those will be scheduled separately on a case by case basis with the respective libraries over the next several weeks and can be done entirely outside of normal business hours.

Libraries Involved:

  • Antigo PL HQ
  • Frances Simek ML (medford)
  • Granton CL
  • Rhinelander DL
  • Tomahawk PL

Submitted by Joshua Klingbeil.

Anne Hamland / ahamland@wvls.org


Five Lessons in Tween Programming

01/09/2017

Association for Library Services to Children Logo

Feeling discouraged about tween programming at your library? This Association for Library Services to Children (ALSC) blog offers excellent short and long-term advice using a Star Wars program as a teaching example. 

Read the full January 6, 2017 article "Five Lessons in Tween Programming" on the ALSC Blog.

Concepts to which librarians are advised to pay attention to in many different contexts:

  1. Relationship building
  2. Collaboration
  3. Flexibility
  4. Tuning into community needs
  5. Smart marketing

In addition to lending her expertise to the ALSC Blog, Librarian and tween advocate Pamela Groseclose blogs at Tween You & Me. 

Submitted by Kris Adams Wendt.

Anne Hamland / ahamland@wvls.org


CLIR Invites Applications for Digitizing At-Risk Audio Materials Grant

01/06/2017

Recording history graphic

The Council on Library and Information Resources (CLIR) is now accepting applications from collecting institutions for the digital reformatting of magnetic audio materials, as part of the pilot phase of the Recordings at Risk grant program. Generously funded by The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, Recordings at Risk is focused on digitally reformatting “at-risk” audio and audiovisual materials of high scholarly value.  This is the pilot phase of new Recordings at Risk grant program that focuses on preservation reformatting of magnetic audio media. 

In this pilot cycle, CLIR will award approximately $150,000 for the preservation reformatting of magnetic audio media through the Northeast Document Conservation Center’s (NEDCC’s) newly established audio preservation service. Grants of between $5,000 and $25,000 will be awarded for projects of up to 12 months, to fall between May 2017 and April 2018.

The application deadline for the pilot project is March 3, 2017. Awards will be announced April 30, 2017.

Prospective applicants must obtain confirmation from NEDCC that their proposed audio reformatting project merits NEDCC’s “high-touch, high-quality” technical approach. NEDCC will then work with applicants on a detailed quote and a letter of support, which must be submitted with the application package to CLIR. CLIR and NEDCC will hold an informational webinar for prospective applicants on January 12 at 2:00 pm Eastern time.

Information for applicants, including a link to the online application form, is available on CLIR’s website at: https://www.clir.org/recordings-at-risk/.

Subsequent calls will allow applicants to submit proposals nominating both audio and audiovisual materials for preservation reformatting, in addition to selecting the qualified digitization service provider of their choice.

News and future developments with the Recordings at Risk program will be available through the program website and Twitter.

The Council on Library and Information Resources is an independent, nonprofit organization that forges strategies to enhance research, teaching, and learning environments in collaboration with libraries, cultural institutions, and communities of higher learning.   

Founded in 1973, the nonprofit Northeast Document Conservation Center serves cultural institutions and individuals nationwide, offering conservation treatment, digital imaging, audio preservation, assessments and consultations, training programs, disaster assistance, and free web resources.

(American Library Direct, January 6, 2017)

Inese Christman / ichristman@wvls.org


You Can Do I.T.! How to Empower Library Staff with Basic Tech Management Skills

01/06/2017

Tech Soup Logo

The library field relies heavily on technology, but few front-line staff receive training in basic I.T. concepts that can build confidence when managing public access computer and working with patrons. The Texas State Library faced this challenge in more than 400 small public libraries in rural areas. They responded with You Can Do I.T., a friendly, approachable hardware, software, and networking skills training program.

Join us for this free webinar to learn how you can demystify technology to empower others around you, no matter your technical ability or where you work. We will share our approaches to I.T. training to engage different learning styles, free and adaptable resources, and lessons learned from hands-on experience in the field.  

Techsoup is providing a free webinar on Wednesday, February 08, 2017, from 1:00am to 2:00pm  CST.  Register here. 

Please note that if you dial in by phone, you may need to provide this additional code: 46101349   

Please contact webinars@techsoupglobal.org with accessibility requests for live captioning at least 72 hours prior to the event.   

This webinar will be recorded and archived on the TechSoup website. Please register for this webinar to receive an email notification when the archive is available.

About the presenters:

Carson Block has led, managed, and supported library technology efforts for more than 17 years. He has been called "a geek who speaks English" and enjoys acting as a bridge between the worlds of librarians and hard-core technologists. He has a passion to de-mystify technology for the uninitiated, and to help IT professionals understand and support the goals of libraries. As a consultant, Carson is often brought in to help solve complex institutional issues and to help align the library's public service mission with its technology efforts to serve the needs of patrons and staff.

Cindy Fisher is a library technology consultant for the Texas State Library and Archives Commission where she travels around the state to serve the needs of small and rural libraries with the You Can Do I.T. program. As a former learning technologies librarian, Cindy loves teaching technology and believes that empathy is the heart of teaching, along with equal doses of patience and curiosity.

Henry Stokes is a Library Technology Consultant at the Texas State Library and Archives Commission. He provides training and consulting for library staff across the state with a focus on emerging technology trends and broadband connectivity. As State E-rate Coordinator for Texas, he supports public libraries participating in the E-rate telecommunications discount program.

Crystal Schimpf is a librarian and trainer with a passion for program design and technology in publc libraries. She has worked on training projects with the Colorado State Library, Infopeople, the Urban Libraries Council, and the Public Library Association. In addition to her work at TechSoup, she is the founder of Kixal, where she creates transformative training experiences for staff in libraries and nonprofits.

(From TechSoup, January 6, 2017)

Inese Christman / ichristman@wvls.org


Beware! New Fake Microsoft Pop-up

01/06/2017

Computer Virus

A new virus is circulating around libraries. The new bug displays a pop-up window, warns users the computer is infected, and instructs them to call a support number. Do not fall for it!

The pop-up page cannot be closed, so here is what you need to do:

  • Kill the browser using your Task Manager (control+alt+delete) OR reboot the computer
  • Reboot the computer
  • Download and run Malwarebytes in safe mode
  • Send in a support ticket to help@librarieswin.org
  • Include screenshots of the Malwarebytes results in the help ticket

Submitted by Chris Heitman

Anne Hamland / ahamland@wvls.org


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